Happy new (tax) year!

In the UK, for various nefarious reasons, the tax year starts on 6th April. I love spring anyway with its sense of fresh starts, but the new tax year always feels like a great moment to take stock of where I am financially. So here’s some of the things you might want to think about whilst enjoying the start of the nice weather.

New year fun times, the financial way. Photo by Sincerely Media on Unsplash
  1. Check out your pension: The tax-free amount that you can pay into a personal pension stays at £40,000 for the 2021/22 tax year in the UK. The lifetime allowance for pension savings remains at £1,073,100 (not a problem for me right now, but good to know!). I’ve written before about working out how much you need in retirement but it’s good to keep an regular eye on where you are at.
    • Make the most of your work pension: if you have a workplace pension, check how much you are paying in and what the employer match is. Since your contribution comes out pre-tax, and hopefully you get a top up, this can often be the best option for pension planning. I pay 10% of my salary to my work place pension, and it’s a significant chunk of my monthly savings.
    • Check out personal pension options: If you don’t have a workplace pension you might have done this already. The most tax efficient way to do this in the UK might be a Self Invested Personal Pensions (SIPP). I have a SIPP with Fidelity, invested in low-cost index funds. At the start of the tax year, I check the investments and if needed rebalance the percentages across the various different funds.
    • Check your state pension projection: If you’re in the UK, check your national insurance contributions and what it means for your state pension. You shouldn’t need to do this every tax year but just putting it out there as a reminder!
Happy financial spring cleaning 🙂

2. Check out your investments. Depending on where you are in your financial journey this could be lots of things, from opening up your piggy bank (thought note, this is not investing!) to reviewing your enormous portfolio. The ISA is a brilliant tax wrapper for UK residents, and comes in lots of different types: cash, stocks and shares, junior. The tax allowance for 2021-2 is £20,000 per person, and you have the tax year to use it since it can’t be rolled over. For me, I have all my investments in a stocks and shares ISA – there are places you can compare the S&S ISA options. At the start of the new tax year I check my investments, and rebalance them if needed. I also check my monthly ISA contribution to try and make the most of the personal allowance – to use up the personal allowance would take £1,666 per month.

3. Set up your financial plan for the year. You might have done this in January, which is when I do my goal setting and overall planning, but because of tax returns, I keep my spreadsheets from April-March, and have a lovely time at the start of April setting them up for the new year.

4. Get ready for your tax return. Ok, you don’t need to start work on it right now but it’s good to get things (receipts, invoices etc) together ready for the fabulous time to come.

So – what are your rituals for the new tax year? Would love to hear from you!